Nasa's Curiosity Rover Sends Super Cool Selfie From Mars

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Nasa's Curiosity Rover Sends Super Cool Selfie From Mars

In its most recent selfie sent back home, Nasa’s Curiosity wanderer demonstrates the auto size portable research facility adjacent to a dull hill where it has been scooping and sieving tests of sand.
The new selfie consolidates 57 pictures taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera toward the end of Curiosity’s arm.
The wanderer has been exploring a gathering of dynamic sand hills for two months, concentrate how the wind moves and sorts sand particles on Mars.
The site is a piece of Bagnold Dune Field, which lines the northwestern flank of Mars’ Mount Sharp.
At the point when the part pictures were taken, the wanderer had scraped the edge of “Namib Dune” and gathered the first of three scoops of sand from that hill.
Amid preparing, an actuator in the specimen handling gadget did not execute not surprisingly when summoned. For the current week, the Curiosity group is distinguishing conceivable purposes behind the actuator’s execution.
“The meanderer reacted appropriately to this surprising occasion. It quit moving the actuator and stopped further utilization of the arm and examining framework,” said Steve Lee, representative task director for Curiosity at Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.
One part of the ridge examination is to see the same area over and over to check for development of sand grains brought on by wind on Mars.
On the off chance that development happens, the group can utilize the meanderer’s wind estimations to make sense of the quality and course of the winds that brought on the development.
Specialists are assessing conceivable destinations for the following utilization of Curiosity’s drill to gather rock-powder tests of the bedrock in the range.

Interest achieved the base of Mount Sharp in 2014 after productively examining outcrops closer to its arrival site and after that trekking to the layered mountain.

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